` Dairy Science Building

 

When the Dairy Science Building (now Building 120) was designed by Rudolph Weaver in 1937, it was distanced from its contemporaries of Dauer, Leigh, and the Infirmary by green and planted space. The small Collegiate Gothic structure housed classrooms, laboratories, offices and a cold storage room. Most research that took place there was dedicated to the surplus of milk produced in Florida during that time. Today, the building houses laboratories, classrooms and offices for the computing division of IFAS. The exterior retains some of its Collegiate Gothic features, although the original cast-stone plaques were installed in the new Dairy Science Building in 1983.

 

Character Defining Features

 

  • SCALE camera
  •           1 story

  • MASSING camera
  •           Rectangular, long side parallel to street and set back

  • ROOF
  •           Flat with parapet and gable

  • ENTRANCES
  •           Centered under pointed brick arches

  • WINDOWS
  •           6 over 6 light with single light transoms

              Double hung

              Wood

  • MATERIALS
  •           Brick is English bond

              Light red flat clay tile with flat ridge cap tiles

  • ORNAMENTATION camera
  •           Cast stone water tabale

              Medallions showing the uses of milk were over the entrances

              Cast stone parapet

  • INTERIOR FEATURES
  • BUILDING-SITE RELATIONSHIP
  •           Long side parallel to street and set back with open space at front


     

    Dairy Science Building

     

    Architect:  Rudolph Weaver

    Building Name:  Former home of the Diary Science Department, now Building 120

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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